Leaving Mumbai behind with 440 sq km, Pune has become the largest city of Maharashtra with 485 sq km.

After the Government of Maharashtra issued a draft notification to merge 23 villages with the Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC), Pune has become the largest city in Maharashtra.

Source

The Maharashtra government has issued a draft notification under Maharashtra Municipal Corporation Act. After the issuance, the total area under PMC would be 485 sq km. However, Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has a total area of 440 sq km.

The notification has been issued after taking suggestions from the Pune Divisional Commissioner. The state government had first proposed the draft to merge 34 villages in 2014. Though, it kept on delaying as only 11 villages were merged.

Total of Rs 9,000 crore to be spent to merge 23 villages

As per the current estimate, the government would require Rs 9,000 crore to ensure basic facilities such as water supply to the residents. The budget has also included money for sewage treatment, solid waste management, and road construction.

The areas to be merged are Mhalunge, Sus, Bavdhan Budhruk, Kirkatwadi, Pisoli, Kondhwe-Dhawade, and New Kopre. Also, Nanded, Khadakwasla, Manjari Budhruk, Narhe, Mantarwadi, and Holkarwadi would be included. Autade-Handewadi, Wadachiwadi, Shewalewadi, Nandoshi, and Mangdewadi is also on the list. Apart from these areas, Bhilarewadi, Gujar Nimbalkarwadi, Jambhulwadi, Kolewadi, and Wagholi are also included.

Several political figures are expecting the implementation to be done in phases to prevent the PMC from the burden of the sudden merger. On the other hand, some of them are also hinting towards the upcoming civic polls of 2022 to be the major reason for this development.

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